Chinga Meteorite Being – 15,000 Years Old

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I’ve been wanting to share this for a few days now, and decided to opt for just posting it rather than striving for something “clever”…

While reading a Tibetan Buddhist article, I came across the story of this statue.

http://m.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-19735959

The hullabaloo is over this statue, presumed to have been carved from the Chinga meteorite, which is suspected to have hit Earth 15,000 years ago. The “authenticity” of the statue is questioned because the being depicted doesn’t look Tibetan. Shucks. I just wonder how a non-Tibetan-looking fellow could show up as a Teacher in Tibet?

Tenpel’s article (the first link) provides more links to other related articles, but I found myself brushing aside all the speculation.

While looking at the pic, I felt a flood of impressions… It seems rather matter-of-fact to me that this statue depicts a being, a teacher, from “another world”.

What do you all think?

9 comments on “Chinga Meteorite Being – 15,000 Years Old

  1. Hi, Les! I remember this face from my Meditations, when I was in the cave of past / the realm of the dead
    Here the face is smiling, there it was a serious face

  2. “What do you all think?”

    As a general rule I avoid speculations of this kind. I file under “makyo” and move on. Please don’t view this comment as being judgemental, in the negative sense. ๐Ÿ™‚

    • I’m kind of with you, Ben, especially since I haven’t really “sat” with this… It sounds like the dating of the carving is even questionable… Something about it caught my eye (and imagination)… Actually, I’ll have to look up “makyo”, but I have a hunch that’s a similar category to where the keyboard in the stream belongs!
      And Troy, that image is really cool, too! I hope I find a few minutes to follow that thread… And I won’t be surprised if our friend appears again in Tauno’s visions, shedding some light on things!

      • Makyo: (Japanese) Fantasies, hallucinations, and seemingly real mental or physical experiences that arise during zazen; they are said to be an obstacle to practice.

        I’m using it figuratively here, though. ๐Ÿ˜›

  3. It is perhaps a case of mistaken identity:

    ๐Ÿ˜‰

    ———————

    Wakuan complained when he saw a picture of bearded Bodhidharma: “Why hasn’t that fellow a beard?”

    Mumon’s comment: If you want to study Zen, you must study it with your heart. When you attain realization, it must be true realization. You yourself must have the face of the great Bodhidharma to see him. Just one such glimpse will be enough. But if you say you met him, you never saw him at all.

    One should not discuss a dream
    In front of a simpleton.
    Why has Bodhidharma no beard?
    What an absurd question!

    http://www.sacred-texts.com/bud/glg/glg04.htm

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